Articles

Samsung Is A Hot Mess. Can Video Be the Fire Extinguisher They Need?

This video from Stephen Colbert is hilarious, unless you are a Samsung Galaxy Note 7 customer. In that case, it’s not so amusing because you probably have burn scars and insurance claims to file. And if you’re Samsung marketing department, have another handful of TUMS.

Samsung needs to extinguish this and video is a part of that.

Samsung Is A Hot Mess. Can Video Be the Fire Extinguisher They Need?
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On-the-Go Video: Using Vertical Video to Engage Mobile Users

Welcome to the age of mobile video. Well, a newer age.  While mobile video has been around for some time now, Snapchat’s discovery buttons have opened up companies to vertical video content like never before. Snapchat’s increasing popularity and style has companies itching to tap into their large user base and vertical video is allowing them to do just that.

Vertical video utilizes the whole screen for users holding a mobile device in a vertical, one-handed position. To put it simply, this is a technical change from filming in widescreen, which has been the default for video up until now. Its rise is mainly due to the fact that it omits the inconvenience of needing to turn your device sideways to view the video full screen. Thus the birth of vertical video: a trend, like it or not, that businesses in some verticals will need to consider as part of their mobile strategies.

Buzz Feed, ESPN, CNN, People, National Geographic, Cosmopolitan and many other outlets have taken advantage of vertical video, using Snapchat as a channel for their content through their own discovery buttons, which appear to every user. The emergence of these channels allows ads to be inserted between the content clips when exploring each discovery button, an opportunity companies can take advantage of. 

Are you ready to test out vertical video?  Here are a few tips for getting started:

  • Keep it mobile: Vertical videos should be kept to strictly mobile channels. Vertical video’s aesthetic doesn’t translate well to other screens – but there still should be the same amount of effort and care used in creating these videos as with any other company video.
  • Create a company Snapchat account: In order to purchase an advertisement on Snapchat you will have to drop a lot of dough.  Your best bet for getting started is to dip your toes in the water by trying out some ideas using your organic audience as a free testing ground for your videos.
  • Practice: A big draw of Snapchat is that videos shared through the platform disappear after a short period of time. When you are first starting out on Snapchat, the audience will be small – but so will the risk. Any less-than-perfect efforts will disappear eventually. Don’t be afraid to try something creative.
  • Utilize Snap-story: While Snapchats delete in ten seconds or less, Snap-stories are accessible for up to 24 hours and can be viewed multiple times. This is ideal for businesses because it creates more opportunity for visibility. Snap-story even keeps track of how many views your post gets (though it won’t show if a person viewed it more than once).
  • Move to other platforms: Once you’re comfortable with the format, try developing more complex videos for your mobile versions of Facebook and Twitter. Unlike Snapchat, you can edit these videos and craft the exact message you want.
  • Gear your videos towards millennials: Vertical video, thanks in large part to the popularity of Snapchat, is a millennial trend. They are less interested in big, wide screens as generations before them and like to enjoy a quick video on the go. Keep this audience in mind when creating a vertical video, as they’ll make up your largest viewership demographic. 

Looking for inspiration for how to make great Snapchats? See how two big names have gotten creative with vertical video:

How CNN & National Geographic are developing vertical video on Snapchat

Acura sent out this exclusive vertical video through Snapchat below to its first 100 followers

On-the-Go Video: Using Vertical Video to Engage Mobile Users
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High Jump

The endless debates surrounding Chicago’s educational institutions have taken the grand stand in Chicago politics. It can be a disheartening landscape. Video Parachute was happy to help draw attention to a program that is a positive light, taking action to really make change for Chicago’s youth: High Jump.

High Jump
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The Personality Test: Does Your Video Have It?

The best lighting, sound quality and direction can’t save a video that is dull and unengaging (as much as we wish it could).

The truth is that your video must connect with your audience in order for it to make an impact. Even if your brand or company isn’t perceived as interesting or exciting, it doesn’t mean you can’t add a personal, engaging element into your videos.

The Personality Test: Does Your Video Have It?
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Videos in Emails Shouldn’t be Embedded. Here’s Why.

Email marketing is a tricky tactic to get right. How many emails can you send without annoying your email list? What subject lines make them want to open an email? How can you get them to not only read an email, but click through to your website?

One popular way to inspire your recipients to do all of the above is to include video. According to eMarketer, one survey found that “respondents who had used videos in their email campaigns saw real returns on their investments. Fifty-five percent reported higher click through rates, 44% saw an increase in the amount of time subscribers spent with an email, and 41% reported an increase in the sharing or forwarding of emails.”

However, in order to get clicks that matter, you need to be strategic in how you attach your video to your email. While many marketers are enticed by the option of embedding videos, there are two reasons why doing so could be detrimental to your click through rate.

1. Embedded Videos Don’t Work For Everyone 

If you want to embed video so recipients can watch without leaving your email, we encourage you to resist the temptation: while some mail clients support embedded videos, many – including Gmail and Outlook – do not. We don’t recommend embedding videos because of the inconsistent experience your recipients will have.

2. Embedded Videos Won’t Bring Viewers To Your Site

You’re sending your email for a reason: there’s a good chance that reason is to lure recipients to your website. What happens when an email recipient has the ability watch an embedded email in their mail client? They’ll click play, watch the video, and then delete your email. While the convenience of watching the video without needing to go to a new page is great for the viewer (if their mail service supports embedded videos), it doesn’t support the goal of driving traffic.

So how can you get your recipients to watch your video AND visit your website?

Include a still from your video in the email that entices readers to click. Choose the screenshot carefully – the moment you choose to highlight can play a big role in the chances of someone clicking to watch. The video still can direct them to a landing page on your website that hosts the video – allowing them to watch the video and then easily check out the rest of your website when they are finished. As an added bonus, including the video on your website can support your SEO efforts, thanks to increased click-through rates, lower bounce rates and a higher likelihood of sharing.

 

Videos in Emails Shouldn’t be Embedded. Here’s Why.
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